Volunteer Positions

Therapeutic riding centers are non-profits, run predominantly by volunteers. Instructors and horses could not do this work alone – we need volunteers! There are a number of volunteer positions that are pretty standard across centers and, in case you think it’s all about being with horses, I wanted to outline some other common volunteer opportunities.

Continue reading

Sidewalker Holds

Is it really October already? Summer flew by and now we’re getting in to the busiest time of the year! I love Fall so I am excited for the change in season and cooler weather. Before I dive in to today’s post, a little programming note: new posts will be coming out every OTHER Thursday until at least the end of the year.

If there is a topic you are interested in, want to learn more about, or have suggestions on please reach out! Email me or comment and I will do my best to put together a post. On to today….

Sidewalkers are one of the most important volunteers in a therapeutic riding program. Sidewalkers are the instructor’s eyes and ears during the lesson and keep clients safe on and around the horse. Sidewalkers are physical and emotional support for clients and clients often look forward to seeing “their” sidewalkers every lesson.

Continue reading

Managing a Group

Many therapeutic riding centers offer only private lessons, but there are centers that only offer group lessons or have a mix of group and private. The center I work at has a mix of private and group lessons and the majority of my teaching hours are from groups.

Continue reading

Water Fun Relay

What You Need:
Bathing tools
Water bucket

This is a fun summertime game that can incorporate a mounted and unmounted activity. It is very hot here in Colorado and July hasn’t even given us the normal afternoon thunderstorms to cool things down overnight. To make riding a little more bearable in the heat of summer, here’s a fun game to play.

Continue reading

Sensory Trails

Sensory trails are often utilized in therapeutic riding to provide a new perspective to clients and stimulate all the senses. Sensory trails combine natural and man-made elements that challenge a client’s balance, encourages interaction, and stimulates the senses. They offer a unique opportunity to experience the outdoors from atop a moving being.

Continue reading