Water Fun Relay

What You Need:
Bathing tools
Water bucket

This is a fun summertime game that can incorporate a mounted and unmounted activity. It is very hot here in Colorado and July hasn’t even given us the normal afternoon thunderstorms to cool things down overnight. To make riding a little more bearable in the heat of summer, here’s a fun game to play.

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Distance Games

What You Need:
Small cones
Poles
Large cones or barrels

With the state of the world, I wanted to come up with a couple ideas to incorporate “social distancing” into our riding lessons. I am offering a few lighthearted ideas here, but feel free to take these on and make them your own. Adjust to each rider’s skill level as needed.

  1. Six Feet Apart: Here is a good way to socially distance volunteers if riders are balanced enough to not need hands-on contact. Ask sidewalkers to stand around the arena and have riders ride toward the volunteer and stop six feet away. At that distance, have riders complete a task, like throwing/catching a ball or do a scavenger hunt -style ride and volunteers give out clues to the next location. It will be helpful to have a marker for six feet – a pole or cone should be enough.
  2. Lava/Alligator Water: Another fun game to talk about distance. Set up barrels and tell riders they cannot ride off the set path because there is lava! Provide a clear path, six feet wide, that the rider needs to stay on to get to the barrel safely. Lining a path with poles or cones provide a good visual marker. Make the path as straight or curvy as your riders can handle.
  3. Pole work: One of my favorite activities to add in lessons are poles and cavaletti. I have done entire sessions (multiple weeks of lessons) on pole work. Set up poles that range from 3-12 feet apart (base this on your horse’s stride) and discuss the spacing of poles in relation to the spacing of people. Ask clients to think about “horse lengths” when out in public.
  4. Dress Up: Have riders pick up different objects around the arena to “dress” their horse. Clothespins with ribbons, hats with long straps, boas, or whatever else you have on hand. Make it fun and have objects for the rider too, including face masks, bandanas, or neck scarfs.

These are all small ideas to make the “new normal” feel a little more accessible. If you want therapeutic riding and your programs to be an escape from these norms then continue with your regular lessons! If you want to help clients adjust to the current times, these are some fun ideas to make it seem less scary. As always, these are just my thoughts and opinions so please use your best judgment in your own situation.

How have lessons changed for you with COVID-19? Let me know in the comments below!

Mail A Letter

What You Need:
Letters
Mailbox

I love games that have a real world takeaway. This is a fun, easy game to play for any rider. As always, scale the game appropriately for the rider’s skill level.

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Patterns: Barrel Racing

I love a barrel racing pattern. It requires minimal setup, is easy to do with a group or individual and incorporates several riding skills and therapeutic benefits.

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Find the Lucky Clover

What You Need:
Buckets
Barrels (or something to place bucket on)
Toys/Rings
One special toy

I’ve talked on the blog before about playing games related to the season or holiday because it keeps me from getting bored. I’ve been teaching for fourteen years and need to find ways to stay fresh! This is a great game I like to play around St. Patrick’s Day, but it can be played any time.

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