Take Care of You

Self-care has been the theme of 2019. Everyone is talking about it – it’s all over Instagram and Facebook (#selfcaresunday) and there’s an emphasis in today’s Millennial-driven culture (of which I am a part!) to take care of yourself. This is not a bad thing! We need to be reminded to slow down, take care of ourselves, and relax. We cannot pour from an empty cup.

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Herd Observation

When I was a kid, I read A LOT. I constantly had a book on me and I was usually reading two or three books at once. At least one book was a horse book. Sometimes it was a fiction story like Black Beauty or Misty of Chincoteague and sometimes it was autobiographies like Monty Roberts’ The Man Who Listens to Horses. I loved reading about horses and then I would take some of the things I read and try it with my horse. This meant that I spent a lot of time observing my horse and it was the best thing I ever did as a kid.

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What is Equine-Assisted Therapy?

I am talking a lot about horses and therapy and equine-assisted therapy and learning and, and, and… but what actually is equine-assisted therapy?

Equine-assisted therapy (EAT) is an experiential therapy that uses a certified mental health professional and an equine to positively impact physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. I am not a mental health professional and do not practice equine-assisted therapy. However, I wanted to explain a bit about what EAT is to head off any future questions.

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Why Horses?

Animal-assisted therapies are growing in popularity and used with pigs, dogs, birds, cats, and horses, just to name a few. I believe all animals are beneficial to our mental and emotional health and wellness, but there are specific reasons to use equines. Horses are unique in therapeutic purposes because of their size, their history, and their movement.

Horses are prey animals so they are always in tune with their environment. They are herd animals, so they are accustomed to working as a group and relying on the herd to meet their survival needs. Horses are also rideable, so they add a layer of movement to therapy work. The horse has an almost identical skeletal structure to a human, which means their movement is very similar to a humans. This is one reason why therapeutic riding is so impactful.

However, a person does not need to ride to benefit from the therapeutic nature of a horse. There are countless ways horses help people, but I will outline a few of the most common today.

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