Dealing with Difficult… People

We’ve all been there. Trying to deal with a difficult person and feeling like no matter what, you can’t win. It can be a difference of personalities, opinions, communication, or simply not getting along with someone. That’s all okay – you don’t have to like every person in the world (and they don’t have to like you)! However, we ALL need to deal with people we don’t always understand.

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Walk from Beside

Horses are big, strong animals. They can be unpredictable and they have an undeniable fight or flight response. These are some of the reasons why horses are such good teachers. Their size can be intimidating and prevents ego from getting in the way. Their strength makes them difficult to bend to human will. Their fight or flight response means you need to be aware of how your actions affect those around you. Horses can teach us so much about ourselves and others just by understanding the horse’s natural state.

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What is Equine-Assisted Therapy?

I am talking a lot about horses and therapy and equine-assisted therapy and learning and, and, and… but what actually is equine-assisted therapy?

Equine-assisted therapy (EAT) is an experiential therapy that uses a certified mental health professional and an equine to positively impact physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. I am not a mental health professional and do not practice equine-assisted therapy. However, I wanted to explain a bit about what EAT is to head off any future questions.

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Why Horses?

Animal-assisted therapies are growing in popularity and used with pigs, dogs, birds, cats, and horses, just to name a few. I believe all animals are beneficial to our mental and emotional health and wellness, but there are specific reasons to use equines. Horses are unique in therapeutic purposes because of their size, their history, and their movement.

Horses are prey animals so they are always in tune with their environment. They are herd animals, so they are accustomed to working as a group and relying on the herd to meet their survival needs. Horses are also rideable, so they add a layer of movement to therapy work. The horse has an almost identical skeletal structure to a human, which means their movement is very similar to a humans. This is one reason why therapeutic riding is so impactful.

However, a person does not need to ride to benefit from the therapeutic nature of a horse. There are countless ways horses help people, but I will outline a few of the most common today.

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